Michael Corn and Ninian Cockran as co-owners of Brodhegs Coal Bank

Michael Corn & Ninian Cockran, co-owners of Brodhegs Coal Bank

According to the 1796 Allegany County, Maryland Circuit Court Patented certificate 340, Michael Corn and Ninian Cockran were co-owners of "Brodhegs Coal Bank", which was purchased from Charles Frederick Broadhag. According to Lowdermilk’s 1878 book “History of Cumberland”, Charles F. Broadhag was a resident of Cumberland, Maryland when Cumberland was incorporated in 1787, and was appointed as Cumberland’s first Postmaster in 1795. He served as Postmaster until 1802.

Click here for a 5469KB PDF copy of the deed and survey. The metes and bounds of the survey indicate that the property was on the north side of "Rushey Run", with portions four to ten perches from the run. Since a perch is 5.5 yards, four to ten perches translates to 22 to 55 yards. On the old Noah Witt mine map, what we now know as Rush Run is labeled “Rushy Run”. Rush Run starts out up by Michael Korn’s Deakins survey lot 3356, and comes out to the Barrelville road at what we now know was Jacob Korn’s Deakin’s survey lot 3352. To see a very large (2530 KB) annotated 1939 aerial photo of the area below Wellersburg that identifies the location of Rush Run at several points, click here. Mike Mckenzie, who is personally familiar with the terrain, reports that the left (north) side of Rush Run is a steep slope. That fact may be why Broadhag's was called a "coal bank". To download high resolution images of the northeast corner of Veatch’s 1787 map of Deakin’s survey in PDF (1618KB) and JPG (1666KB) format, click here and here, respectively.

Ninian Cockran also knew and did business with Henry Korn. The 1837 Allegany County, MD Circuit Court Record GGB 4, p. 83 shows Henry Korn and Ninian Cockran as co-owners of the 34-3/4 Acre tract named "Chauncey". This Henry Korn would propably either be Henry (born 1767, died 1860), the brother of Michael Korns, Sr., or Henry Korns, Jr. (born 1815, died 1878), the nephew of Michael Korns, Sr.

According to volume 652, page 8 of the 1797 "Laws of Maryland", Ninian Cockran had a store at Jenning's run, since the book references "...the road leading from Ninian Cockran's store, at Genning's run on the Turkey Foot Road, up Will's creek by John Tomlinson's mill, in Allegany county, to the Pennsylvania line.". (This statement is basically repeated on Page 214 of Dulany's 1882 "History of Maryland", which mentions a road in 1797 "...leading from Cochran's store, at Jenning's run, on the Turkey Foot road, up Will's Creek by Tomlinson's mill to the Pennsylvania line.".) The 1799 "Laws of Maryland" states "...the road leading from Ninian Cockran's store, at Genning's run, up Will's creek, by John Tomlinson's mill, in Allegany county, to the Pennsylvania line…". From these descriptions, I suspect (i.e. guess) that Cockran's store was located at or near what today is Corriganville, MD, and I suspect that Tomlinson's mill may have been located generally along what is now the Ellerslie Road NW. Click here to see why there is only one logical place for a road northward from Jennings Run, toward Bedford.

According to the Votes and Proceedings of the House of Delegates, in 1804, Ninian Cockran was listed as a "surveyor of Allegany county". According to the 1949 book "The Genealogy of Michael Korns, Sr. of Somerset County Pennsylvania", John Tomlinson sold 200 acres of land in Londonderry Township, Bedford County to Michael and Jacob Korns on August 23, 1796, and this is the earliest known record of Michael Korns in what is now Southampton Township, Somerset County, PA. Later, in 1812, Michael Korn sold his 1787 Deakins Survey military lot 3356 in Maryland to John Tomlinson.

The signature of Ninian Cochran shown below is from a survey that he did for Jacob Korn.

Ninian Cochran signature from a Jacob Korn survey.

Click here for a satellite image showing a road that goes from Michael Korn's lot 3356 in Maryland to Corriganville. I don't know if this is an old road or not.

I don't know of any other men named Michael or Henry Corn/Korn living in Allegany County, Maryland during this time period, so these records evidently pertain to our family members. From the Deakins Survey, and also from the aforementioned Korns book, it is very clear that the last name of our Michael Korn and his brother Jacob was sometimes recorded as "Corn".

The aforementioned Korns book contains information which suggests that, in a later real estate dealing, Michael Korns purchased land from John F. Mifflin, who had formerly been the attorney of John Penn, the elder. In Somerset County, Pennsylvania Deed Book 9, Pages 249-252 (John Anderson, et. al. to Daniel Uhl), it appears that there was a conflict in land ownership between Jacob Korns and the estate of John Mifflin, Esq. of the City of Philadelphia, counsellor at law. According to volume 652, page 8 of the 1797 "Laws of Maryland", Ninian Cockran had a store at Jenning's run, since the book references "...the road leading from Ninian Cockran's store, at Genning's run on the Turkey Foot road, up Will's creek by John tomlinson's mill, in Allegany county, to the Pennsylvania line.". (This statement is basically repeated on page 214 of Dulany's 1882 "History of Maryland" mentions a road in 1797"leading from Cochran's store, at Jenning's run, on the Turkey Foot road, up Will's Creek by Tomlinson's mill to the Pennsylvania line.".) The 1799 "Laws of Maryland" states "...the road leading from Ninian Cockran's store, at Genning's run, up Will's creek, by John Tomlinson's mill, in Allegany county, to the Pennsylvania line…".

The next image below is an 1874 map of the Barrelville area. It shows where we think Broadhag's coal bank was located, relative to Michael Korn's 1787 lot no. 3356. Mike McKenzie scouted that area out in 2009, and there is a bank along the west side of Rush Run not far from the location of lot 3356 that might be the "Broadhag's Coal Bank" property. Mike saw a few test holes that appeared to have been dug into the bank. There was some shale at the holes, and the shale seems to have been dug out. He did not see any coal or coal shale. There are also some strange looking yellow rocks in the area. Mike also noticed some iron ore in Rush run. There is spring beside the aforementioned bank. There was a piece of a large cast iron cooking pot there. Mike also noticed a portion of a brick in the area. Mike thinks there were some old fields above the bank at one time, on account of locust trees and stone piles. The stone piles are probably from field clearing. Nothing that Mike saw indicated any kind of commercial mining [1] .

Mike found an old road just a few hundred feet from the "bank" that follows down along Rush Run. Mike followed the old road and found a few old horse shoes and iron items, including a hook and a large round link. Mike believes that from the artifacts he found, it was an old and well-used road.

Mike indicated that when he had been in this area previously with his brother, he saw stones stacked up as if there had been a dam across Rush Run that had filled in with sediment, This dam-like structure had been just below the bank, but Mike could not find it during his 2009 trip.

1874 map of property tracts

Return to the Korns family genealogy home page

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Footnotes

[1] So much time has gone by that it is conceivable that a tunnel might have collapsed and grown over. It is also conceivable that no mining whatsoever was done at Broadhag's Coal Bank.